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ADHD Doesn't Prevent Fame, Success

When a child is diagnosed with ADHD, parents often worry about how their child will struggle in school, on the job and in relationships.

However, as the website of Parenting magazine has reported, many successful people once struggled with ADHD. Here are seven notable names from Parenting's "19 Famous People with ADHD" list:
  1. Jim Carrey
  2. Bruce Jenner
  3. Solange Knowles
  4. Michael Phelps
  5. Michelle Rodruquez
  6. Will Smith
  7. Justin Timberlake

Labels: celebrities, success

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Writer Says Parents' Support Helped Her Deal with Challenges of ADHD

Tennessee Reed has written six books. Her latest, Spell Albuquerque is a memoir about her experiences growing up with learning disabilities. She has also written a one-woman play that was produced in her hometown, and shes currently writing a novella.

A Jan. 13 article by Angela Hill of the Oakland Tribune provided the following look at Reed's ability to overcome childhood challenges thanks in large part to the support of her mother and father:

[Reed's literary accomplishments are] not bad for someone who, when she was in kindergarten, was told by teachers and various education experts that her multiple learning disabilities, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, would prevent her from ever reading or writing, much less accomplishing much in life at all.

"Some people have stopped their lives after hearing something like that," Reed, 32, said from her West Oakland home, where she lives with her parents, renowned author Ishmael Reed and choreographer Carla Blank.

"But with my family, that's not our M.O.," Reed said, with a knowing grin. "We don't stop. Since I was a kid, I was always told to write 10 minutes a day. So I wrote journals and poems. It really comes naturally."

Labels: success, parents, writing

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Coach Helps ADD Student Succeed

Emily was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder when she was in high school. She remembers "spacing out" in class and not knowing how to answer when the teacher called her name. Because she didn't like the way ADD medication made her feel, Emily and her family tried something different - an ADD coach.
"'With Emily, what I worked on a lot was planning for homework assignments,' [Kara] Goobic says. She taught Emily how to handle a syllabus by putting deadlines for papers on her calendar, and by helping her break big projects down into smaller chunks."
Her coach also helped her create a college schedule that took her ADD into account. So far, it's working: Emily completed her freshman year of college with a 3.4 grade average. Source: NPR

Labels: students, success, coaching

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Author to Speak about ADHD

This week, the regular CHADD (Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) meeting at Hickory Valley Christian School in Chattanooga, Tennessee, will have a special guest speaker. Author Chris Dendy will give a presentation titled "School Daze" that focuses on strategies for success in school.
"Among other elements of her presentation will be executive function of the brain, which has emerged as a key factor influencing school success or failure for students with ADHD. Since teachers may attribute disorganization, forgetfulness and memory problems to laziness or lack of motivation, development of an educational plan to address these deficits is critical."
Ms. Dendy has authored three books, including one that was co-authored by her son, Alex. She has an M.S. from Florida State University and is co-founder and clinical advisor for the Gwinnet, Georgia, chapter of CHADD. Source: The Chattanoogan

Labels: schools, success, failures

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Does Having ADHD Mean Doing Poorly in School

Most studies of students who have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder find that school kids with ADHD struggle in the classroom. They struggle to pay attention, finish homework on time, and get good grades. But does it have to be this way?
"In the end I think that this research points out something that many educators, doctors, and parents of ADHD/ADD children already know: We need to collaborate to find definitive strategies that will help these children be successful in school. These strategies need to be widespread, taught to teachers and parents alike."
Parents are their children's greatest advocates. As the parent of a child with ADHD child, you can be the catalyst for the collaboration that's necessary to level your child's educational playing field. Source: Brain Blogger

Cedars Academy is a private boarding school that specializes in children with ADHD.

Labels: schools, success

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Young Woman with Asperger's Syndrome Makes it to Finals of "America's Top Model"

A young woman with Asperger's Syndrome made it to the top five on the popular television reality show "America's Next Top Model."

Heather Kuzmich, a 20 year-old student from Valparaiso, Indiana, was eliminated from the competition after making the finals and being voted viewers' favorite for eight weeks in a row.

Ms. Kuzmich has a form of autism that is characterized by difficulties in communication, inability to read others' cues, and unusual social interactions. Some of her traits, such as her inability to hold eye contact and tendency to glance sideways, gave her modeling photos an edgy quality. However, when faced with the challenge of living with twelve other contestants, her disorder sometimes put her at a disadvantage. She often needed telephone support from her mother when the others made fun of her.

Ms. Kuzmich told the New York Times that the contest was a personal way to test her limits as a person with Asperger's Syndrome.
"It was a point in my life where I was thinking either Asperger's was going to define me or I was going to be able to work around it," she said.
Visit Your Little Professor to find schools and camps for children with Asperger's.

Labels: success, media, support

Posted By: Aspen Education Group 0 Comments

Young Woman with Asperger's Syndrome Makes it to Finals of "America's Top Model"

A young woman with Asperger's Syndrome made it to the top five on the popular television reality show "America's Next Top Model."

Heather Kuzmich, a 20 year-old student from Valparaiso, Indiana, was eliminated from the competition after making the finals and being voted viewers' favorite for eight weeks in a row.

Ms. Kuzmich has a form of autism that is characterized by difficulties in communication, inability to read others' cues, and unusual social interactions. Some of her traits, such as her inability to hold eye contact and tendency to glance sideways, gave her modeling photos an edgy quality. However, when faced with the challenge of living with twelve other contestants, her disorder sometimes put her at a disadvantage. She often needed telephone support from her mother when the others made fun of her.

Ms. Kuzmich told the New York Times that the contest was a personal way to test her limits as a person with Asperger's Syndrome.
"It was a point in my life where I was thinking either Asperger's was going to define me or I was going to be able to work around it," she said.
Visit Your Little Professor to find schools and camps for children with Asperger's.

Labels: success, media, support

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